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Plymouth Podiatry - Located in Plymouth, MA 02360, Phone: (508) 747-1973 and Taunton, MA 02780, Phone: (508) 824-9571

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT DO YOU SEE A PODIATRIST FOR?

Podiatrists are foot health experts who are trained to prevent, diagnose, treat, and rehabilitate medical and surgical conditions of the foot and ankle. If you are having any problems regarding your feet or ankles, our podiatrists can help you treat these ailments, either with conservative care or surgical intervention. Some health conditions can make you more susceptible for foot issues and a podiatrist can help you address prevention as well.

HOW OFTEN TO REPLACE RUNNING SHOES?

You need to replace running shoes when they are worn out. Most runners wait far too long to do this and risk overuse injuries as a result. Running shoes should last between 400 and 600 miles, though this depends on your weight, how much you run, and the force you use to strike the ground. Heavy runners who pound the ground every day over long distances will wear out their footwear much quicker than a light jogger who runs once or twice a week. As you approach the “worn out” mileage mark, see how your shoes feel. If they leave your feet feeling fatigued, replace them.

Don’t wait until the tread on your soles is worn completely flat, or you’re seeing the midsole showing through the bottom, to replace running shoes. If you have pain in your lower limbs when you run, have them examined. 

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I REPLACE ORTHOTICS?

When to replace orthotics depends on the degree of wear and tear they’ve endured. These prescription support pieces are made with durable materials, but they do wear down over time. Running or exercising in your orthotics tends to break them down faster, too. A well-made pair is designed to last for several years. If yours are causing foot pain while wearing, it could be a sign that they need to be replaced. The insoles may be losing their shape and function. It is also possible for your feet to change over time. This affects how the support piece fits your foot and can cause discomfort. In either case, you will need to have your custom orthotics replaced.

If you’re concerned that you need new prescription inserts, contact us to make an appointment so that our doctors can examine and evaluate your feet to ensure that you have the custom orthotics you need. 

IS FOOT SURGERY PAINFUL?

Foot surgery itself is not painful. For any kind of procedure that involves opening the body, your foot will be treated with some kind of anesthetic. Often the anesthetic is localized—it only affects the specific area of your foot that is being treated. 
Any pain in the surgery process comes after the procedure is finished. Once the anesthetic wears off, you can feel the effects of the swelling and inflammation that follow a surgery. How painful this will be depends on you. If you have a low pain tolerance or your procedure was particularly complex, you may experience a fair amount of discomfort. A high pain tolerance and minor procedures may cause less pain. The surgeons at Plymouth Podiatry are pain management experts, so we will help you with a post-operative recovery plan designed to minimize your discomfort while you heal. If you believe you may need foot surgery or have any questions about your lower limbs, contact our offices for an appointment or more information. 

HOW OFTEN SHOULD A DIABETIC FOOT BE CHECKED?

Quality, invested foot care is one of the most important aspects of living with diabetes, so having a regular diabetic foot check-up is essential. You need an experienced professional, like our physicians Plymouth Podiatry, to do a complete inspection of your lower limbs at least once a year. If you have severe diabetic foot complications, you may need to be seen more often. We are also accepting routine nail care patients. 

Even though your full check-up should be once a year with your doctor, you should also be doing self-checks every day. This allows you to catch abnormal changes early and get prompt help before the problem deteriorates. If you have diabetes, Plymouth Podiatry’s skilled and experienced staff help you manage your condition. 

HOW DO I SAFELY KEEP MY FEET WARM?

If you have diabetes, poor circulation can make your toes feel cold, but you need to take extra care when warming diabetic feet. This is because nerve damage, is often associated with the disease. Diabetic neuropathy damages the nerves in your feet, leaving you unable to realize if a heating pad or bath water is too hot— and you could end up getting burned.  The safest way of keeping diabetic feet warm is to wear a toasty pair of socks made of moisture –wicking materials. Then, slip your stocking feet into some comfy slippers for added warmth, and protection. A little massage or activity will get your blood flowing, and that helps too.